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Revit’s Blind Spots: 10 Obvious Features missing from Revit

It's rather amusing that certain fundamental features are noticeably absent in Revit despite its long-standing presence and the significant subscription fees we pay. It's disappointing that some basic features, which should have been incorporated from the outset, are still missing. As a result, we have compiled a list of the top 10 features that ought to have been included in Revit.

1. No Area Boundary in Design Option

No Area Boundary in Design Option


Area boundaries define the boundary of a specific area or room. However, when using design options to explore different design alternatives, area boundaries cannot be assigned to a specific design option, which can make it difficult to manage and update areas within the project. Check out this post for the alternative.

2. No Color Scheme in RCPs


No Color Scheme in RCPs

RCPs (reflected ceiling plans) are an essential part of many architectural projects, and color-coding can be used to differentiate between different elements within the plan. However, Revit does not support the use of color schemes within RCPs, which can make it more difficult to understand and interpret the plan. Alternatively, the filter shall be used to color-code ceiling types and even filled regions can be used, which is a time-consuming process.

3. No Tag for Column


No Tag for Column

In Revit, a tag is used to label and identify different elements within the project. However, columns cannot be tagged, which can make it difficult to differentiate between different columns and understand their properties and parameters. Alternatively, we recommend using the multi-category tag or keynote tag as it works for all the model categories.

4. No Room Bounding for Structural Column


No Tag for Column

Room bounding is a feature in Revit that allows designers to define the boundaries of a room based on different elements within the project. However, structural columns cannot be used as a boundary for rooms, which can make it more difficult to define and manage rooms within the project. For architects, there are two options for this: use the architectural column with the multi-category tag or use the structural column with room separator.

5. No Fore/background Patterns in Color Scheme


No Fore/background Patterns in Color Scheme

Revit supports the use of color schemes to differentiate between different elements within the project but does not support the use of double patterns (i.e., two patterns layered on top of each other). This can make it more difficult to differentiate between similar elements within the project. It is hard to maintain the consistency of the graphics throughout the drawings due to this limitation.

6. No lineweight of the surface pattern control in Filter and color scheme


No lineweight of the surface pattern control in Filter and color scheme

Revit allows users to filter and display different elements within the project based on certain criteria. However, the lineweight of surface patterns cannot be controlled within the filter and color scheme, which can make it more difficult to differentiate between different elements based on their surface patterns. This pushes us to use the filled region to meet the graphic standard.

7. Grid Line is not centreline


Grid Line is not centreline

Grid lines are an essential part of many architectural projects, and are often used to define the layout and orientation of different elements within the project. However, grid lines in Revit are not centerlines, which can make it more difficult to accurately place and align different elements within the project. Alternative workflow is suggested in this post.

8. Changing the plan types doesn't change the related view template


Changing the plan types doesn't change the related view template

In Revit, view templates are used to control the display settings and properties of different views within the project. However, changing the plan type (e.g., floor plan, ceiling plan) does not automatically change the related view template, which can make it more difficult to manage and update different views within the project. Ensure to change the view template when the floor plan type is changed.

9. No Cut Mark Type for Ramp


No Cut Mark Type for Ramp

Cut marks are used in Revit to define the location and orientation of different elements within the project. However, there is no specific cut mark type for ramps, which can make it more difficult to accurately define the location and orientation of these elements. This pushes us to use the detail items of break line to present the ramp correctly.

10. Assembly cannot be grouped


Assembly cannot be grouped

Elements can be grouped together to make them easier to manage and manipulate. However, assemblies cannot be grouped, which can make it more difficult to manage and update these elements within the project. Further information is available in this post.

Summary

These missing features can create challenges for designers and architects when working on projects in Revit and may require workarounds or the use of third-party plugins to overcome. However, it's worth noting that Revit's functionality is constantly evolving, and some of these limitations may be addressed in future releases.

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